Tag Archives: reference

Applying Patches to Drupal or Modules on Mac OS X

I’ve had to run a number of patches to Drupal modules before, and I’ve always done them on my Windows machine simply because that is what has the most instructions available to do so. At the moment though I am away on holidays and only have my Macbook Pro, so when I needed to run a patch I debated going to the effort of doing it through a Windows virtual machine that isn’t set up for it, or set up Eclipse and run it through their software. After much debating, I decided to look up the instructions again and see if there was a recommendation. While I was hunting around, I noticed two very, very useful things:

  1. Apple’s Xcode suite allows you to run Drupal patches.
  2. You can patch files using the OS X terminal without any need to install special software such as what I needed to do to run patches through the Windows Command Prompt. You don’t even need to have Xcode installed!

I already have Apple Xcode, as does every Mac user (if they choose to install it from their OS X disc), so that seemed like it would potentially be the easiest option, then I saw the instructions to patch a Drupal module using the OS X Terminal. It is so easy I can’t believe I didn’t start patching on my Mac sooner!

The process to patch a Drupal module on Mac

  1. Place both the original module file and the patch in the same folder.
  2. Make sure that they have the same name, with different extensions, so you would need my_module.patch and my_module.module.
  3. Open up the Terminal application. Either search for Terminal in Spotlight, or go to Applications > Utilities > Terminal.
  4. Navigate to the folder containing your files using the Terminal cd command. By default Terminal will start in your user directory, so if your files are in a folder called patch/my_module inside your user directory, you would type: cd patch/my_module. A little trick here to save yourself some trouble is just type cd and then drag the folder into the Terminal window. OS X will auto-fill the folder path for you.
  5. Run the patch using the patch command: patch < my_module.patch

That’s it! Simple as that.

If you would like to take a back up of the original patch file, type: patch -b < my_module.patch and a backup file will be created for you entitled my_module.module.orig

If you are patching Drupal core, the process is slightly different, you need to use the -p0 attribute to stop patch from asking you what file to patch, so you would do this as: patch -p0 < my_module.patch

Those are probably the main things you’ll use, but for more information, here are some other references:

One other thing to note is that if your .patch and .module files don’t have the same name, then Terminal does sometimes have issues with it. I’m not sure why exactly.

Hope that helps! If you’ve got any other tips for patching on OS X I’d love to hear them!

CSS Clip Property

I recently came across the clip property on the Web Designer Wall, it’s a property I’ve not heard of before, probably because I’ve not really had a need for it, but now that I know what it does, there are so many things it would save time with!

The example below is an excerpt from the Web Designer Wall:

.clip {
 position: relative;
 height: 130px;
 width: 200px;
 border: solid 1px #ccc;
}
.clip img {
 position: absolute;
 clip: rect(30px 165px 100px 30px);
}

How it works is you have a surrounding element, such as a div or li which sets the overall width and a border which gives the appearance of masking the image. It also sets the position of relative so that on the img tag, we can absolutely position it within the outer element.

The img tag is then set to position: absolute; with a clip property that clips the image to a rectangle shape (so it can also be a square).

The uses of this property are potentially huge, especially for image galleries, and you can also resize images by specifying the width and height on the img tag. Perfect for a gallery, as long as the images you are scaling aren’t huge, you don’t want images that appear small ot take a long time to load after all!

The big downside of this is that according to the SitePoint CSS reference, Internet Explorer up to and including version 7 do not fully support it, so you may need to use a variation on the syntax especially for Internet Explorer. The way I understand it,  you just need to use spaces instead of commas in the rect() syntax for Internet Explorer, but I haven’t had a chance to test this yet to be sure.

Even if it doesn’t work fully in Internet Explorer, you could easily implement it in a way that will gracefully degrade in IE.

I’m looking forward to using this property, have you used it on one of your sites? I’d love to see how you’re using it, let me know in the comments!