Tag Archives: marketing

Don’t Settle For Less

I get emails from a website called Service Seeking when there is a job listed that is related to my field of work, specifically web design. I have practically given up on it though as there seem to be a number of firms on there now that come in with quote on under $1000 on pretty much every job, including jobs that I cannot see any way possible to do for under $6000 unless those working on it are paid around the $2 an hour mark. It’s just not possible.

I find firms that offer quotes like this to be degrading, they devalue the job and the designer. The brand image should be an important part of any business. A business should be willing to recognise that they need to spend money to get a job done well. Once it’s devalued, it can be difficult to help customers realise that our time as designers is valuable, that we are in control of how their business looks online and that subsequently if we are undervalued, we cannot make their business look good.

There was one new job listing posted today that reads:

“Hi, I am currently in the process of putting together my own … business and as I am still in the researching stage I am just simply after quotes so that when I am ready to hire in a few months I know exactly who to call. I am after a company that can build my … site exactly to my needs, be easy and helpful to work with, fast and can also host my website for me. I expect to pay no more then $1000 if not less and would like my website to be put together in a couple of weeks as when I am ready to go I want to get up and running asap.”

I’ve edited out a couple of points that may make this business identifiable, but what they are asking for here is pretty unrealistic. Part of one point that I had to remove is that they are after e-commerce functionality as they need to be selling things online. They want it for under $1000 AND done in a matter of weeks. Basically it’s a case of wanting the world for nothing, which is becoming all too common in web design. Let’s break it down and look at it more closely.

Let’s say we use Drupal for the content management system on this project with Ubercart handling the e-commerce side of things.

  • Installation of Drupal with Ubercart and other required modules could be done in about half an hour.
  • Customisation and testing of Drupal, Ubercart and other settings could take anywhere from an hour upwards. In my experience it averages at 5-10 hours.
  • Setting up and testing Ubercart with PayPal could take half an hour to an hour.
  • Doing up the graphics for a design with a customer that sounds like they are going to be picky could be anywhere from 2 hours to 15 hours.
  • Converting the graphic design to a Drupal template using another template such as Framework to form the basis of the design could be 5 to 15 hours as well depending on complexity of the design, not to mention ensuring that it suits the e-commerce side of things as well.
  • Consultation times, could vary from 1 to 10 hours.
  • Miscellaneous extra 1 to 15 hours.
  • Total minimum: 15 hours work.
  • More likely minimum: 40 hours work.

At an average rate of $85 per hour, that’s an absolute minimum of $1275, but more likely $3400. That’s still a cheap e-commerce website, and costs more than 3 times the amount they want it for. Most e-commerce sites that I have worked on have been around the 50-60 hour mark or higher. By devaluing the market, clients don’t realise just how much they need to invest in this sort of thing.

Compare it to radio or TV advertising where advertisers will unquestioningly pay $5000 upwards on advertising campaigns, many looking at over $20,000 for one campaign, it’s a big difference, especially considering your website is advertising for you 24/7 compared to your TV or radio advertisement that’s only 30 seconds or so here and there!

One thing to keep in mind is that you always get what you pay for and you certainly cannot get the world for nothing. Don’t get me wrong, there are some quality designers that have specials and do quality work for cheap. In the end though you need to analyse what you need and be prepared to pay for it. You don’t have to pay top dollar, just ensure that what you are paying for is what you really want.

A final example to leave you with. I had one client previously whom I quoted for. They decided to go with another group who quoted them about a fifth of what I did. After the other group completed the website, I thought I should point out to the client the (numerous) accessibility issues with any non-IE7/8 browser. By the time they had paid the other group to get everything right, they ended up paying more than what I had quoted them in the first place, so paying a bit more to start off with would have saved them both time and money, and potentially saved them on any damage to their reputation that the poorly designed website could have caused.

Investigate your options and make an informed decision, don’t just go with what seems to be the cheapest.

Experimenting with Landing Pages

At TerraMedia, I am currently working on an interesting project. That is, I am working on pushing the website up in search results for a number of different regions.

One of the ones I am working on at the moment is users searching forĀ  web site design and related services in the Byron Bay region. If you do a quick search in Google for “web design Byron Bay” or “Byron Bay web design” or similar, TerraMedia cannot be found on the first page of results. The home page of TerraMedia is visible on the second page in the case of both those queries, but we would like it high up on the first.

There are a couple of places to start here, the first is to update the home page to more specifically target Byron Bay, or, to create a landing page which is optimised for Byron Bay searches. We don’t really want to adjust the home page too extensively as it is currently placed quite well for a number of other regions, so we decided to begin with landing pages, starting with Byron Bay.

To start off with, I have setup a new page on the TerraMedia web site that has all of the keywords we are looking for in both the page title and the page address. The page that I have set up is located at http://terramedia.com.au/web-site-design-services-byron-bay and uses some new copy that is based on copy used in other sections of the website combined with some newly written information to help target potential Byron Bay clients.

A sub-domain or domain that is specifically relevant to these terms may be easier to rank higher, but at the same time, they would lose the benefit of being on the terramedia.com.au domain and could confuse the user in the case of a completely different domain name. Wouldn’t you be confused if you went from say “websitedesignservicesinbyronbay.com” to “terramedia.com.au”? That domain is an exaggerated example and is much too long, but I’m sure you can see how it could get confusing.

Now that the page is created I will be developing links to it and marketing it through our Facebook page and Twitter account.I want to get twitter followers for our page to see how it goes. The aim is then to push this page up in search results specifically regarding web site design in the Byron Bay region.